The United Nations Association of New York
presents


Inside a Closed Kingdom

Karen Elliott House
on Saudi Arabia

Author and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist




Monday, September 23, 2013

6:00 to 6:30 p.m. | Registration
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. | Presentation
7:30 to 8:00 p.m. | Reception and Book Signing

 

 

Steelcase
4 Columbus Circle (58th Street and Eighth Avenue)
New York, NY

 

ADMISSION

UNA Members: $10
UNA Student Members: FREE
Guests and Non-Members: $15



ON SAUDI ARABIA
Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines — and Future

From Karen Elliott House, the Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter who has spent the last thirty years writing about Saudi Arabia — as diplomatic correspondent, foreign editor, and then publisher of The Wall Street Journal — an important and timely book that explores all facets of life in this shrouded Kingdom: its tribal past, its complicated present, its precarious future.

Through observation, anecdote, extensive interviews, and analysis Karen Elliott House navigates the maze in which Saudi citizens find themselves trapped and reveals the mysterious nation that is the world's largest exporter of oil, critical to global stability, and a source of Islamic terrorists.

In her probing and sharp-eyed portrait, we see Saudi Arabia, one of the last absolute monarchies in the world, considered to be the final bulwark against revolution in the region, as threatened by multiple fissures and forces, its levers of power controlled by a handful of elderly Al Saud princes with an average age of 77 years and an extended family of some 7,000 princes. Yet at least 60 percent of the increasingly restive population they rule is under the age of 20.

The author writes that oil-rich Saudi Arabia has become a rundown welfare state. The public pays no taxes; gets free education and health care; and receives subsidized water, electricity, and energy (a gallon of gasoline is cheaper in the Kingdom than a bottle of water), with its petrodollars buying less and less loyalty. House makes clear that the royal family also uses Islam's requirement of obedience to Allah — and by extension to earthly rulers — to perpetuate Al Saud rule.

Behind the Saudi facade of order and obedience, today's Saudi youth, frustrated by social conformity, are reaching out to one another and to a wider world beyond their cloistered country. Some 50 percent of Saudi youth is on the Internet; 5.1 million Saudis are on Facebook.

To write ON SAUDI ARABIA, the author interviewed most of the key members of the very private royal family. She writes about King Abdullah's modest efforts to relax some of the kingdom's most oppressive social restrictions; women are now allowed to acquire photo ID cards, finally giving them an identity independent from their male guardians, and are newly able to register their own businesses but are still forbidden to drive and are barred from most jobs.

With extraordinary access to Saudis—from key religious leaders and dissident imams to women at university and impoverished widows, from government officials and political dissidents to young successful Saudis and those who chose the path of terrorism — House argues that most Saudis do not want democracy but seek change nevertheless; they want a government that provides basic services without subjecting citizens to the indignity of begging princes for handouts; a government less corrupt and more transparent in how it spends hundreds of billions of annual oil revenue; a kingdom ruled by law, not royal whim.

In House's assessment of Saudi Arabia's future, she compares the country today to the Soviet Union before Mikhail Gorbachev arrived with reform policies that proved too little too late after decades of stagnation under one aged and infirm Soviet leader after another. She discusses what the next generation of royal princes might bring and the choices the kingdom faces: continued economic and social stultification with growing risk of instability, or an opening of society to individual initiative and enterprise with the risk that this, too, undermines the Al Saud hold on power.

ON SAUDI ARABIA: a riveting book—informed, authoritative, illuminating — about a country that could well be on the brink, and an in-depth examination of what all this portends for Saudi Arabia's future, and for our own.


Karen Elliott House is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter. She is the former president of Dow Jones International and a former foreign editor, correspondent, and publisher of The Wall Street Journal (WSJ).

House joined the WSJ as a reporter in 1974. She was named assistant foreign editor in 1983; foreign editor in 1984; vice-president of the Dow Jones International Group; and president of the International Group in 1995. In 2002, House was appointed publisher of the WSJ.

In 1984, House was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for a series of WSJ interviews with Jordan's King Hussein. She is also the recipient of the Overseas Press Club's Bob Considine Award for best daily newspaper interpretation of foreign affairs (1984 and 1988); the University of Southern California's Distinguished Achievement in Journalism Award (1983); Georgetown University's Edward Weintal Award for distinguished coverage of American foreign policy (1980); and the National Press Club's Edwin M. Hood Award for Excellence in Diplomatic Reporting (1982).

House is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations and vice chairman on the board of trustees for the RAND Corporation.


FROM THE REVIEWS

"The internal contradictions of a medieval theocracy in thrall to modern-day petrocapitalism give Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist House ample material . . . Illuminating . . . cogently written." Publisher's Weekly

"An engaging and lucid exploration of Saudi politics and culture . . . recommended reading for all those seeking a new perspective on one of the world's most consequential societies." Henry A. Kissinger

"An incisive analysis of divisive dynamics inside the world's most important supplier of oil. House asks hard questions about the future of Saudi Arabia." Graham Allison, Director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University

"Karen House's On Saudi Arabia is a book that future Saudi leaders should read carefully. It exposes incisively and dispassionately the social contradictions and the potential political vulnerabilities of contemporary Saudi Arabia. A timely and truly important book." Zbigniew Brzezinski, former United States National Security Advisor

"In her definitive book On Saudi Arabia, Karen House demonstrates an unparalleled understanding of the dynamics of Saudi society. Her extraordinary access to Saudis from all walks of life and her keen insights into the impact of Islam and the governing style of the ruling family on the lives of Saudi citizens greatly enrich the reader's understanding of this significant Middle Eastern country." Susan M. Collins, United States Senator and Ranking Member of Homeland Security Committee

"Arabia doesn't willingly lay bare its secrets to outsiders. But Karen House has returned from repeated travels with a work of genuine political judgment and poise and balance.  She made her way into the lives of princes and commoners alike and into the yearnings of Arabia's young people. She neither scolds, nor apologizes. This is a book of genuine curiosity." Fouad Ajami, Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution


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