Spring 2015
UNA-NY Leadership Luncheon Panel


A Path Appears:
Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity

with

NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
New York Times reporter, Pulitzer Prize winner


SHERYL WUDUNN
Pulitzer Prize winning author and reporter


 

 

Monday, June 8, 2015

12:00 p.m. | Registration
12:30 p.m. | Luncheon
1:15 p.m. | Program and Book Signing


Columbia University Club of New York
15 West 43rd Street
New York, New York


LUNCHEON REGISTRATION

$75 per person | UNA-NY MEMBERS
$85 per person | NON UNA-NY MEMBERS


NOTE: This is a formal seated luncheon, and price includes tax and gratuity, as well as a copy of the book, which will be made available for the book signing session. Seating is very limited.


NO PAYMENTS AT THE DOOR.
If you would like to attend at the Members Price, please enroll for a UNA membership here.



A PATH APPEARS is an essential, galvanizing narrative about making a difference here and abroad—a road map to becoming the most effective global citizens we can be.

The United Nations Association of New York is pleased to welcome Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn as special guests to our Spring 2015 Leadership Luncheon, for a discussion of their latest book, A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity.

In their number one New York Times best seller Half the Sky, husband-and-wife team Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn brought to light struggles faced by women and girls around the globe, and showcased individuals and institutions working to address oppression and expand opportunity. A Path Appears is even more ambitious in scale: nothing less than a sweeping tapestry of people who are making the world a better place and a guide to the ways that we can do the same—whether with our donations, with our time, by capitalizing on our skills as individuals, or by using the resources of our businesses.

With scrupulous research and on-the-ground reporting, the authors assay the art and science of giving, identify successful local and global initiatives, and share astonishing stories from the front lines of social progress. We see the compelling, inspiring truth of how real people have changed the world, upending the idea that one person can't make a difference.

The work of Kristof and WuDunn also inspired a 4-hour documentary film, as well as Half the Sky — a growing movement to amplify the book's impact and help the fight to end the oppression of women and girls around the world.

A Path Appears offers practical, results-driven advice on how best each of us can give and reveals the lasting benefits we gain in return.

We hope you will join us for our Spring 2015 Leadership Luncheon, co-hosted by the Columbia University Club, and become inspired by Kristof and WuDunn, who know better than most how many urgent challenges communities around the world face today.




NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF, a columnist for The New York Times since November 2001, is a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner who writes op-ed columns that appear twice a week.

Mr. Kristof grew up on a sheep and cherry farm near Yamhill, Oregon. He graduated from Harvard College, Phi Beta Kappa, and then won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, where he studied law and graduated with first class honors. He later studied Arabic in Cairo and Chinese in Taipei. After working in France, he caught the travel bug and began backpacking around Africa and Asia, writing articles to cover his expenses. Mr. Kristof has lived on four continents, reported on six, and traveled to more than 150 countries, plus all 50 states, every Chinese province and every main Japanese island. He's also one of the very few Americans to be at least a two-time visitor to every member of the "Axis of Evil." During his travels, he has had unpleasant experiences with malaria, mobs and an African airplane crash.

After joining The New York Times in 1984, initially covering economics, he served as a correspondent in Los Angeles and as bureau chief in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Tokyo. In 2000, he covered the presidential campaign, and he is the author of the chapter on George W. Bush in the reference book The Presidents. He later was Associate Managing Editor of the Times, responsible for Sunday editions.

In 1990 Mr. Kristof and his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, until recently also a Times journalist, won a Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of China's Tiananmen Square movement. They were the first married couple to win a Pulitzer for journalism. Mr. Kristof won a second Pulitzer in 2006, for what the judges called "his graphic, deeply reported columns that, at personal risk, focused attention on genocide in Darfur." Mr. Kristof has also won other prizes including the George Polk award, the Overseas Press Club award, the Michael Kelly award, the Online News Association award, and the American Society of Newspaper Editors award. Mr. Kristof has taken a special interest in Web journalism and was the first blogger on The New York Times Web site; he has a Facebook fan page and a channel on YouTube, as well as more than 1 million followers on Twitter.



SHERYL WUDUNN, the first Asian-American reporter to win a Pulitzer Prize, is a business executive, lecturer, and best-selling author. Currently, she is a senior managing director with Mid-Market Securities, an investment banking boutique helping growth companies, including those operating in the emerging markets. At MMS, she raises capital for a variety of clients: men and women entrepreneurs in new media, media technology and social enterprise. She was also a Senior Lecturer at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs in fall 2011.

Previously, Ms. WuDunn has been vice president, in the role of investment advisor for private clients, in the investment management division at Goldman, Sachs & Co. and a commercial loan officer at Bankers Trust. She also worked at The New York Times as both an executive and journalist: in management roles in both the Strategic Planning and Circulation Sales departments at The Times; as editor for international markets, energy and industry; as The Times's first anchor of an evening news headlines program for a digital cable TV channel, the Discovery-Times; and as a foreign correspondent for The Times in Tokyo and Beijing, where she wrote about economic, financial, political and social issues.




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